Resources that Private Music Teachers Love

Posted from: Music Matters Blog

Music Teacher’s Helper (one of my favorite resources!) recently conducted a survey asking private music teachers what their favorite resources are. They compiled the results into this handy, hyperlinked infographic (including yours truly :-) ):

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“It’s Too Hard!”

Posted from: Music Teacher's Helper Blog

5 ways to Help a Student Get Past Overwhelmed

By Robin Steinweg

 


“It’s too hard!”

 

“I can’t do it!” “I won’t do it!” “It’s too hard!”

(Read more…)

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Mid-winter Motivation

Posted from: Music Teacher's Helper Blog

Being a person who is strongly nourished by sunlight and warmth, this is a hard time of year for me. That makes mid-winter a great time to remind myself why I really do love my job. This list is a compilation of many individuals’ thoughts, so most of us will find something we can relate to.

  1. I get to keep learning new music all the time.
  2. I am giving a gift that will last a lifetime.
  3. My young “clients” are adorable and amazing. (Read more…)
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Minimalist Philip Glass sought to maximize his piano-playing potential

Posted from: Piano Street's Classical Piano News

By the time Philip Glass had decided to better himself as a pianist, he had already been a successful composer for almost 30 years. His music had been used in the Olympic Games and movies, and he had been a worthy successor to such seminal minimalist composers as Reich and Riley. The journey he began in 1994 covered the following 19 years, and, during that time, he composed each of the chronologically numbered etudes he intended to use to make himself better at the keyboard. During that time, he kept them mostly to himself; in fact, he had never even published the first 10. There was only one recording, which he did himself.

Philip Glass discusses The Etudes:

Video Playlist:
1. Interview with Philip Glass
2. Maki Namekawa plays Etude no. (Read more…)

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Improve Beginner Trumpet Embouchure With The P.E.T.E

Posted from: Music Education Magic

Do you have a trumpet or trombone player that can’t play high notes?  Maybe they can’t get a good solid tone because of lack of strength in their facial muscles?  Are they frustrated?  Read on to find out how I solved this problem for many of my beginning band students using a cool little practice device called a P.E.T.E.

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Improve Beginner Trumpet Embouchure With The P.E.T.E

Posted from: Music Education Magic

Do you have a trumpet or trombone player that can’t play high notes?  Maybe they can’t get a good solid tone because of lack of strength in their facial muscles?  Are they frustrated?  Read on to find out how I solved this problem for many of my beginning band students using a cool little practice device called a P.E.T.E.

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Positive or Negative Teaching?

Posted from: Music Teacher's Helper Blog

This post is about the effectiveness of positive vs negative teaching.

What exactly do I want to get across to this student?  Where do I want to take him/her, and what’s going to be the most effective way to get there?   Any engaged teacher will regularly consider these questions.  And one way to sharpen our awareness of these questions is to think about positive vs negative communication.

The first thing I do on a positive note with a student is to listen to them play.  Even if they are playing badly, I like for them to play long enough for me to have time to catalog in my mind all the basics that are being done WELL. (Read more…)

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Keep Your Studio Relevant with Pianoflix

Posted from: Music Teacher's Helper Blog


 

After you received your undergrad music degree, performed a stellar recital of the classics, turned in that
lofty thesis, passed a professional accreditation exam or somehow earned shiny, new initials behind your name, you probably felt a great sense of achievement. Perhaps you felt like I did? After I received my Master of Arts in Piano Performance and Pedagogy, I felt my career was professionally wrapped up and ready to launch. Although my intent is not to discount the importance of the academic achievements listed above, I’m wondering if you–like me–had your bubble burst, your box tipped upside down and your bow unraveled when you entered the real world of piano teaching? Yes, I could play and teach Beethoven and Ravel, I could design a sequential curriculum for early learners but when asked to read from a lead sheet, my skills fell embarrassingly short.

Since that shattering revelation of my shortcomings some 25-plus years ago, my teaching and professiona (Read more…)

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Review of Good Music Brighter Children by Sharlene Habermeyer

Posted from: Music Matters Blog

I hope you all had a wonderful Christmas and New Year’s! Reviews have been absent for a while here on the blog this past holiday season for the sake of regrouping, spending time with my wonderful family, and for the sake of meeting my goal to thoroughly go through the aforementioned (in the title) book so it could be the next review.

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I was quite intrigued by “Good Music Brighter Children-Simple & Practical Ideas to Help Transform Your Child’s Life Through the Power of Music” after reading the overview of its content, and I was most definitely not disappointed once I got my hands on the book and began reading it! Originally published 15 years ago, this revised and updated version is the culmination of 25 years Habermeyer has spent researching and studying the positive effects music can have on humans.

One thing I really appreciate about this book is that the findings documented in the book are not just credible because of the plethora of stories, studies, practical applications, an (Read more…)

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International Piano – January/February 2015

Posted from: Piano Street's Classical Piano News

A new issue of International Piano is out! Content highlights:

  • Jeremy Siepmann explores piano duos with some of the world’s leading exponents
  • Cover story: The return of Ivo Pogorelich
  • Mature pianists: The next generation of musical role models
  • Cruise ships: Life on the open seas
  • Piano partnerships, part four: Piano trios
  • The Piano Etude: The evolution of the genre, in conversation with Clare Hammond
  • Education: Newark College’s course for piano technicians
  • Summer schools: Residential courses in the coming year
  • (Read more…)

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‘The need NOT to look’ when sight reading

Posted from: Music Teacher's Helper Blog


Can you relate to this?

Do you have students who constantly feel ‘the need to look’ at their hands when sight reading and learning music on the piano?  Perhaps they try to memorise the music quickly before they have learnt it sufficiently, then make many mistakes when playing it because they have forgotten what is actually in the music?

Do these students also regularly lose their place in the music and therefore get annoyed with their playing?  The answer would be “Oh yes they do” in my experience.

I needed a solution that works well for me and my students in order to stop ‘the need to look’ at their hands.

(Read more…)

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Behind the Scenes of the Piano Puzzler

Posted from: Piano Street's Classical Piano News

So, what is a Piano Puzzler? On the air every week, Bruce Adolphe re-writes a familiar tune in the style of a classical composer. One listener gets on the phone, and the caller listens to Bruce play his Piano Puzzler. They then try to do two things: name the hidden tune, and name the composer whose style Bruce is mimicking. In this video we get behind the scenes and learn the core secrets behind the construction of a Puzzler.
Further listening and reading:

Piano Street: Can you figure out these Piano Puzzles?

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