Software Updates – Bigger Text Box for Lesson Notes & More

Posted from: Music Teacher's Helper Blog


These smaller feature tweaks and fixes announced each week is just a portion of what our programming team spends their time on. The majority of their time is spent working to bring you a much-improved user experience that include new and overhauled features based mostly on member input. We will continue to release these larger feature upgrades gradually and be sure to let you know with in-software announcements and emails. Great changes are coming that we know you will be so pleased with.

This week’s feature updates & fixes:

  • Added the ability to upload multiple files at once to the File Upload area.
  • Fixed a bug that occurred when copying and pasting events on the calendar.
  • (Read more…)

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Music is for Life

Posted from: Music Teacher's Helper Blog

By Robin Steinweg

How can I impress on my students that music is for life? Few sports can be played into later years. But music is for life. A job might be fulfilling until retirement. Music is for life.

I’ve started a master class series in which I’ll invite elderly musicians to share their music and their stories.


Martha Nelson shares why music is for life

(Read more…)

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What Can You Do in 30 Minutes?

Posted from: Music Teacher's Helper Blog


There are so many facets to a musical education; reading, theory, ear training, transposition, repertoire, and on and on. One of my personal frustrations is trying to get students ready to perform in special events without enough lesson time. Is it realistic to think that a teacher can cover all these skills and prepare for competitions with just 30 minutes a week with each student? With longer lessons more can be accomplished, but parents may be resistant to increasing the lesson time due to time and financial concerns. However, maybe as teachers we are not presenting a realistic picture of what they are getting for their investment. Below are some thoughts about better defining what can be accomplished over time with various lesson lengths. This is just one example, but perhaps it will encourage you to think about how you define your product.

Piano Basics

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8 Things You Didn’t Know About Piano Technique – A Guest Post by Doug Hanvey

Posted from: Music Matters Blog

A Word from Natalie: Perhaps the most impactful thing I have learned in my years of playing and teaching piano is the importance of understanding and properly using the body to achieve artistic playing with the greatest ease. The three greatest catalysts of this in my own education were: my teacher and mentor, Sylvia Coats, attending a one-week Suzuki teacher training led by Doris Koppelman, and the fabulous workshops of Beth Grace on Beyond Scales and Hanon. I have experienced first-hand the immeasurable value of using proper technique when playing piano, and I have seen students (both my own, transfer students, and students I have taught in masterclass settings) suddenly accomplish musically or technically what they didn’t think was possible when I help them understand the basic principles of Gravity, Strength, and Conduction. So I am excited to host Doug Hanvey as a guest today because he touches on some of these issues that have been “game-changing” for me. I hope (Read more…)

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A New Look At Teaching Beginner Clarinetists

Posted from: Music Education Magic

Unless you have been playing it your entire life teaching a beginner to play the clarinet can be a challenge. Lesson books can help, but the vast majority of lesson books used these days in a public school band setting are ensemble books that by nature have to progress in a certain way. In a new article over on the Vandoren reeds website clarinet pedagog Paula Corley she goes through a step by step progression of concepts that she uses with her beginners.

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Using MTH Creatively IX – Drag and Drop!

Posted from: Music Teacher's Helper Blog

DRAG yourself to the beach and DROP onto that lawn chair!

Despite how much I love teaching, I genuinely look forward to my time off. After a long January through March with no breaks, I can hardly wait for Spring Break!

Do you ever hold lessons for part of a day before a vacation starts, or occasionally cancel some, but not all, lessons on a given day?

Here is a quick and easy way to edit the calendar for a partial day of lessons.

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Software Updates – This and That

Posted from: Music Teacher's Helper Blog


We are always working hard behind the scenes to add and edit features, as well as fix minor issues that pop up. This past week we fixed several minor bugs and recently launched an updated file area.

This week’s feature updates & fixes:

  • Fixed a bug that input multiple entries of a parent’s payment when multiple Music Teacher’s Helper tabs were open in the same browser.
  • Corrected a bug where the “Set Attendance” screen opened as a new window in some versions of Internet Explorer.
  • Changed the styling of a few field on the event creation screen to make it more intuitive.
  • (Read more…)

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Why is Debussy’s Clair de lune the most downloaded piece?

Posted from: Piano Street's Classical Piano News

A challenge for both the intermediate pianist and the professional, Debussy’s Clair de lune seems to contain specific qualities which both instrumentalists and listeners find attractive. The piece, which is a part of the composer’s Suite Bergamasque, is the most downloaded piano score in Piano Street’s sheet music library. Due to its popularity it appears in many re-arranged versions for different instruments and in music genres such as jazz and world music.

Did Debussy manage to strike a line between the abstract impressionistic scenery and the beautiful melodic lines of romanticism? Does the open harmonic landscape appear attractive to everyone regardless of musical background? What do you think?
Please post your comment below!

Here we can hear a lovely rendition by the Macedonian pianist Simon Trpceski:

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Lessons from “Whiplash”

Posted from: Music Teacher's Helper Blog


Is there a takeaway for music teachers from the movie Whiplash?

**Spoiler alert!   If you haven’t seen the film yet, check it out on DVD, and then come back and join the discussion. **

First things first.  There’s no doubt that the character of Fletcher is nothing short of mentally ill, but more of that later.  Let’s look at what the movie can tell us about music and teaching.


One plus is that, for those moviegoers who might think about music the way most of Andrew’s family did in the dinner table scene (hello, politicians and school administrators! (Read more…)

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Posted from: Music Education Magic

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File Area Improved!

Posted from: Music Teacher's Helper Blog

We’re excited to announce that the file area has been improved and the updated version is now available in your account. Here are the three changes:

1. Drag files from your desktop into the browser window to upload – in addition to clicking the upload button, you can now save time if you have files readily available on your desktop by clicking and moving with your mouse to upload.


 

2. You can now drag and drop to change sort order of the files - adjust the order of your files in seconds by selecting the file you want to move with your mouse and drag it to your desired order.

(Read more…)

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Piano Street at the Music Education Expo 2015 in London

Posted from: Piano Street's Classical Piano News

Piano Streets stand at last years expo.

Piano Street's stand at last year's expo.

Music Education Expo takes place on March 12-13 2015 at The Barbican in London. It is the largest national music education conference and exhibition in the UK, and it’s completely free to attend if you register in advance.

Piano Street will present new educational material at our stand D31 at the exhibition. We hope to see you there!

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